Swimming lessons for infants and babies

This one’s thrown me for a bit of a loop. Our son LOVES bathtime and looks forward to it every night. For the longest time he would scream as soon as we took him out, wanting desperately to return to his tub and water toys. This seemed to carry over to a trip we took when he was about 8 months old. The weather cooperated and we were able to go swimming in the complex’s swimming pool pretty much every day. Our son’s reaction was similar to his daily baths. He loved the pool. He was happy to splash about for as long as we’d let him, kicking his legs and attempting to mimic his mother as she blew bubbles and motored him around in the warm water.

Fast forward to his first birthday. We’ve registered our son in weekly swimming classes geared specifically for infants his age. Either my wife or I join him in the pool throughout the session and play the primary role in moving him about in the water, following the instructor’s guidance. Here’s the thing, despite being surrounded by other children his age who seem to enjoy their baby swimming lessons, and despite the pool water being quite warm, he appears not at all pleased to be there. Week after week his face shows concern while in the pool and in cases where he’s temporarily given over to the instructor before being returns (via the water) to one of us he lets loose completely.

I’m hoping this is just a temporary thing and that he’ll warm up to both the instructors and the public pool because at this point he gets upset enough that it disrupts the session for the other families involved.

Any suggestions are eagerly welcomed.

Baby clothes sizes continue to confound me (in this case baby life jackets and baby PFDs)

Click here to review some Children’s Life Jackets as well as Children’s PFDs.
We ultimately purchased a Mustang Survival Child’s Life jacket, though being in Canada we purchased from a local retailer since Amazon doesn’t offer to ship this product to Vancouver.

This weekend we left for a few days at the cabin which involves a short drive to a local harbor followed by a not-so-short water taxi ride from the mainland to the cabin. The Kidlet is presently about 3 months old and a robust 16-17 lbs based on last visit to the doctor. Now, prior to the trip I did a bit of research to find out where I could find a baby life jacket and guess what? All the information I could track down pointed to life jackets not being certified for children under 20 lbs (or was it 30? It’s too much work to find the page again on the crappy Canadian Government maze of websites) which suggested we shouldn’t worry about it. That seemed like a bad idea, so we went ahead and purchased the smallest approved PFD we could find (and yes it was a PFD and not a life jacket, and yes I did read that life jackets do a better job or keeping the wearer oriented upright).

PFD and life jackets / life preservers for babies and infants are available to purchase Anyhow, we got to the boat, got aboard with the Kidlet in his Baby Bjorn and then proceeded to remove him from the Bjorn and put on the PFD. I’ll say this again, the Kidlet is no more than 20 lbs and the jacket we purchased is for children between 20 and 30 lbs. It was ridiculous. He looked like he was going to tear that thing apart. When we zipped it up to the top it looked like his jowls were going to spill over the neckline.

I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again. Baby sizing is ridiculous. At best it represents a near estimate of whether or not your baby will be able to wear the clothing. Why don’t they include dimensions as many adult clothing makers do as well in order to address the wide range of baby sizes out there? The PFD we purchased was for children up to 30 lbs or, apparently, chubby babies up to 17 lbs.

I would love to know how many tons of baby clothes are purchased and never worn each year simply because parents have no way other than ages ‘sizing’ and in some cases weight ‘sizing’ on which to base their purchase decision?